Captain Roger’s Rules of Sailing

(Collected during mmy 38 day passage from the Panama Canal to Hiva-Oa, Marquesas, French Polynesia – Society Islands with Mike Keohane and Davyd Cohen)1. Reboot (my sailboat, insert you boat name here) is always trying to kill us.2. Every line, sheet, halyard and hose will snag at every opportunity.3. The wind is always too much, too little, or from the wrong direction.4. Never try to improve anything you need to get to your destination. You may break it instead.5. The waves will always be highest and on the beam when you are trying to cook.6. Things will stop working for no apparent reason. They will start working again for no apparent reason. These failures are impossible to debug.7. Things break. The broken component will be inaccessible without dismantling most of the boat. 7a. (corollary) The tools you need will be equally inaccessible without emptying all the lockers.8. The worst day sailing is better than the best day in the dirt world.Fair winds and following seas (especially
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Saturday


Last night we (Mike, David and I) went to the cruisers Friday night gathering. Some nights it is sparsely attended, last night we were a big group. As we were heading home the heavens opened and it began to rain. After about a half hour there was a break on the rain and we headed back to Reboot. About 1 AM I was awakened by the sound of canvas slapping. The sun cover for the cockpit had ripped loose and was banging. I went out to fix it, within 2 minutes I was drenched. In the dawn light we saw that the harbor water was brown and full of grass and tree branches. The dinghy had a foot of water!I went in to shore in the morning. I met Kevin Ellis at Yacht Services Nuku-Hiva. Kevin has been kind enough to let me hook up my gaming computer and do the large game update downloads. Since Huku-Hiva is a small island there is not a heck if a lot to do. I have compensated by helping Kevin with various small projects. Today we went up to the wood shop he used to own and built bookshelves and a n
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Pacific Cruising Information

The New Soggy Paws One great thing about world cruising is that we all support each other. One of the most critical kinds of support is “local knowledge.” If you are planning on spending any time in the Pacific Ocean I strongly suggest you click on this link to
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SailboatRacing-Rebootusa60493/~3/mbaDWK7jGTM/pacific-cruising-information.html

Internet connectivity

When one makes multi-day or multi-week passages over time access to the Internet is one of those things that one craves Early on when making landfall the question arises: Where can I get on the Internet? After a couple of days -when one has dealt with the banks, ,equipment suppliers, family and close friends one (or at least I) start to wonder why I cared. In truth once the business is done of me the Internet just becomes another way to pass the time.Fair winds and following seas 🙂
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Falling into old habits

When my ASUS eeePC died I needed something to replace it. I ended up purchasing a Kindle Fire 8 HD. It didn’t take long once I got internet access again to see how one programs these new phone and tablet devices. I downloaded Android Studio. Of course it turns out that the Fire is an android device. I have learned a number of computer languages over time. I have also learned various ways that they are
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Flooded!

No, not Reboot! The dinghy outboard engine. I went in for a quiet Sunday morning on shore. At about noon it was getting quite hot. I decided it was. Time to go back to Reboot for a swim.I went out to the dinghy. The fuel tank was bloated as I had closed the air vent on the fuel tank. I opened it, let the excess air out and tried to start the engine. After about 50 pulls I decided the engine was flooded. (I was both relieved and distressed when two cruisers were also unable to start their engines.) I returned to shore for about 15 minutes. When I returned I once again tried to start the engine again. No luck. Then I remembered from the carburetor days of my youth! I cranked the throttle fully open and pulled. A cough. Pulled a second time – zoom zoom! The magic solution from my youth.Fair winds and following seas 🙂
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