“CRUISERS HELPING CRUISERS”

Sitting on a dock or being in an anchorage the answer is pretty simple. Volunteer to help the boats around you. But what can you do if you are a dirt bound wannabe? (No offense intended, we were all there once and most of us will end up there again.) If you have spare time and ambition the answer is to be an information source. Adopt a cruiser or twoI was very fortunate that when I started full time cruising 10 years ago I made friends with 3 extraordinary people via the Maritime Mobile Service Net (http://mmsn.org) They have followed me and supported me for ten years and still do (with the exception of one we lost to cancer.) With a special mention of Bill Sturridge. What do they do?1. Receive my sailing plan and make sure I get to my destination. 2. Coordinate with International rescue authorities when necessary – like when I lost my lowers 1200 nautical miles from land in the Pacific Ocean. Yes, we saved Reboot.3. Send me “heads up” information on weather and destinations.4. Conta
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Battling Muezzims

In the anchorage in the Banda Islands, Indonesia we are surrounded by mosques. Each mosque performs the “azaan” (call to prayer) and I believe also recite the “salah” (the five daily prayers plus the Friday prayer.) From our somewhat central location in the water we can hear the prayers from several mosques. Since the “muezzim” (the person actually doing the call) is different for each mosque we get a variety of voices. What could easily be a cacophony blends and twists and is actually quite beautiful. It is a shame that I don t understand a word they are saying.It is my understanding that the salah cycle is from sunrise to sunset. This morning I was sleeping in the cockpit and was awakened by the muezzim at about 4 am. Since the call resonated from every mosque I assume this was a special prayer.Fair winds and following seas 🙂
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Horn and Thursday Islands

We are in the anchorage at Horn Island. This anchorage is better protected from the wind so the boats don t move around quite as much. On the other side of the channel is Thursday Island. (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thursday_Island). Its anchorage is exposed to the trade winds. With the wind peaking at over 30 knots it is not a great place to set anchor. Daisy, Steve and I took the ferry over to TI yesterday. It is a small community. We had a great Aussie breckie and then explored the main area of town. Two major reactions: although there are many different stores the selection in each is very limited and prices are at least 25% higher for everything. We did have a beer in the northern most bar in Australia. Which was OK. Then continued our tour. We finally stopped at Customs and Border Protection to see about checking out later in the week. Fair winds and following seas 🙂
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Night Lights

I am in the anchorage area of Airlie Beach. Since I am on the edge I leave my AIS on and show an anchor light at night. There are a large number of boats on mooring balls. They don t show anchor lights. At night I feel like I am alone but when the sun comes up i have dozens of boats near me. It is a very strange feeling. Fair winds and following seas 🙂
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Brisbane River anchorage

Last night I exited the Brisbane River like a thief. I have enjoyed my time in Brisbane but the facilities leave a great deal to be desired. I anchored in the river between Mowbray Park and New Farm. The bottom is mud and the strong current reverses. This means the anchor resets four tines a day. And drags. I solved this problem by adding a stern anchor to keep from swinging out into the channel. That worked until both anchors started to drag. Last night at slack tide I had enough, hauled both anchors and departed.There are a lot of mooring balls (and boats) in the river but almost no guest balls. The mooring fields occupy the best anchorages. It is hard to find a spot as the few guest facilities are almost always full. Finding a place to land a dinghy is also difficult. The fields are not well marked. Traveling down the river at night I had to keep a very sharp lookout to prevent Reboot from hitting moored boats with dim anchor lights.Then of course there are the Citi-Cats. These fer
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Savusavu


Savusavu anchorage at dawn. We had a delightful 4 day transit from Neifu, Vava u, Kingdom of Tonga to Savusavu, Fiji. Our entire time in Tonga had been accented by almost daily rain. We expected to have rain on the transit. We left under cloudy skies and once out of the island influence the skies cleared. We had beautiful clear skies all the way to Savisavu. Winds were consistently about 20 knots. We set the whisker pole and had a fast downwind run. We arrived early on Sunday morning (bad planning, it meant we had to pay overtime to check in.) We started the engine for the final approach but the winds kept shifting so we were able to sail. Then, for no apparent reason the engine overheated. (Rule 7) We shut it down and continued to sail. At that point the wind died to zero. I took advantage of the calm to go down and see if the engine had overheated from a lack of sea water flow. All of a sudden the boat healed 15 degrees. We had gone from zero wind to 20 knots in 5 seconds with a maj
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