Passage: Banda to South Buru

Just finished the passage from the Banda Islands to South Buru, Indonesia. It was a two day downwind trip in light air that left me both annoyed and frustrated. A few observations:1. Even gentle seas (less than three feet) with waves abaft the beam can set up a rolling motion that “snaps” the sails. The motion creates a wind that collapses the sail on each roll. This results in a “snap” as the sail fills on the reverse roll. Not only does this beat up the sail but it slows the boat down. The closer to dead down the worse the effect.2. Solo sailing places constraints that can be very frustrating. When “Harmonic” blew past me with their asymmetric spinnaker I rued my lack of crew. I have a beautiful asymmetric in a sail bag on my bunk. It is difficult but not impossible to rig with two, easy with three, suicidal solo!3. Some sail configurations are more stable than others. Going “dead down” (wind at 150
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SailboatRacing-Rebootusa60493/~3/dteXFpo5dF0/passage-banda-to-south-buru.html

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Battling Muezzims

In the anchorage in the Banda Islands, Indonesia we are surrounded by mosques. Each mosque performs the “azaan” (call to prayer) and I believe also recite the “salah” (the five daily prayers plus the Friday prayer.) From our somewhat central location in the water we can hear the prayers from several mosques. Since the “muezzim” (the person actually doing the call) is different for each mosque we get a variety of voices. What could easily be a cacophony blends and twists and is actually quite beautiful. It is a shame that I don t understand a word they are saying.It is my understanding that the salah cycle is from sunrise to sunset. This morning I was sleeping in the cockpit and was awakened by the muezzim at about 4 am. Since the call resonated from every mosque I assume this was a special prayer.Fair winds and following seas 🙂
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SailboatRacing-Rebootusa60493/~3/HP2HlDZwSBk/battling-muezzims.html