Broken Boats

Mechanical things break. Cruising boats, being mechanical things, break. Since I am alone most of the time I quickly assume it is only me. That is not good for my attitude. Since joining the Sail 2 Indonesia rally I am not only in the company of other boats but we all talk to each other. I discovered that I am not the only one who has problems. I feel better. I am not sure if this is good or bad. Fair winds and following seas:)
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SailboatRacing-Rebootusa60493/~3/Qq7m_QRa30o/broken-boats.html

Solar woes

Having solar panels on a cruising sailboat is just about a given. People talk about how many watts of solar they have. But I was reminded that sometimes it just doesn t work out. On my trip from Gladstone to Cairns I was heading North(ish) the entire way. The sails shaded the solar panels. Even on a bright sunny day I did not get much charge. Fair winds and following seas 🙂
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SailboatRacing-Rebootusa60493/~3/lBchZbnRr0s/solar-woes.html

Bugs

The natural kind. One of the first rules of cruising is to never let cardboard on your boat. It is well known that cockroaches lay eggs in cardboard. In the past couple of days I have had a different twist. Flies. All of a sudden I have had a bunch of flies on Reboot. They were not healthy. That is they were easy to kill. I finally traced the source. At least I think I did. The boxes of kitty litter. When I opened one I discovered plastic bags of litter inside. Since then I have removed all of the litter from the boxes and the boxes from Reboot. No more flies. Fair winds and following seas 🙂
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SailboatRacing-Rebootusa60493/~3/9Hdna4dYPts/bugs.html

The Ugly

Copy of a Facebook post about the cruising life.***********Final thoughts on this thread offered after 8 years, around 30,000 nm (I stopped counting years ago,) and three ocean crossings (Atlantic solo, Atlantic crew, Pacific 1/2 solo, 1/2 crew):1. What you read in the classic sailing books is very dated. The Caribbean has been destroyed by the cruise ship industry. Most islands are only interested in your money. The nightlife is gone. Cruise ships leave, everyone closes their stores and restaurants. I have never been in the Med (yet) but the Portuguese and Spanish coasts are not cheap.2. Sailing is a very slow way to get anywhere. One hundred (100) nm per 24 hour day is a good average. If you are going to anchor between sunset and sunrise realize in the winter that is only 8 hours. At 5 knots average that is 40 nm. You need to plan. You can easily get “closed out.” The Med in winter. The Caribbean and parts of the Pacific in hurricane season. Once there (wherever there is) you should
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SailboatRacing-Rebootusa60493/~3/-aaut4AkJNI/the-ugly.html

Thanks

I originally posted this on a cruising web site but it deserves to be shared with all my readers…Warning – RANT ONOn another cruising forum I was complaining about their recent policy to charge money for webinars. It got me in a mood. On a day when many are sharing the blessings of a Saint with good Irish whiskey I share the posts without further comment.FREE FREE FREEI complain again (although no one seems to be listening) that XXXX is now a business (that, I admit, doesn t pay well.) What happened to cruisers helping cruisers? I do a radio seminar at rallies (for free.) I just put a couple who lost their boat in the Tasman Sea up on Reboot (for free.) (…)************My second post.Having had time to work myself up to a dither…..I would be remiss if I did not comment on all those who for FREE have helped keep me safe and sane for the last eight years of cruising.Top Contributors: KI4MMZ, KM4MA, W3ZU. For daily position reports and weather information, coordinating with several
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SailboatRacing-Rebootusa60493/~3/zCWVl2bsSEs/thanks.html

Cruising Budget – How Much Does it Cost?

(In all the years I have been posting this series has been the most popular. In case you missed it…)There has always been a great interest in knowing how much to budget for the cruising life. The answer is always “it depends.” I too was frustrated by the “it depends.” In an effort to shed some light on the subject here is my take on the parameters of “it depends.” I own a 42 sailboat and have done some cruising in North and Central American, Portugal, Spain and the Canaries, and in the Caribbean. My personal take is that one can cruise and tour comfortably in a 40 to 45 foot boat for about $2,500 to $3,000 per month. One can “live aboard” for much less. I am assuming that you are on a sailboat to see the world, not stay in a relatively small area.The Big IssuesThere are four factors that have an overall influence on both initial and operating costs. They are:What risks you are willing to take,How much comfort you desire,What you consider to be a prudent insurance profile,Where you c
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The physicality of cruising

My previous poet got me thinking about the great secret of the cruising life – it is hard work. Yes, staying up all night standing watch, cranking on winches to adjust the sails, grabbing handfuls of sail cloth to coax the main down in a strong wind, these all take physical strength. Add manhanding the ground tackle (anchor and rode) and dealing with dock lines. But they don t tell the real story.Consider the three modes of being in port: marina, mooring buoy, or at anchor. For two of the three everything – and I mean everything – has to be brought out to the boat by dinghy. And how did the food, water, clean laundry, propane, repair parts, repaired sails, etc. get to the dinghy? Why one lugs them across town to the dinghy dock. Usually for quite a distance. Sure, for a big provisioning run you might hire a cab to take your stuff back. In some ports the grocery store might even deliver. But most days we all (cruisers) buy a couple of shopping bags of “stuff” and lug it back. Even in a
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SailboatRacing-Rebootusa60493/~3/vTr86bl2a00/the-physicality-of-cruising.html

What a drag

The cruising guides caution that the holding in Pago Pago harbor is not very good. After a day and a half of heavy rain we were hit by strong gusty winds to about 30 knots. The result is that about 7 boats dragged. (We did not really get a chance to drag as we raised anchor and ran away! The advantage of not single handing. Of course standing on the bow in heavy rain is not the most fun. We reset away from the action.)Just when we thought it was over we got a call on the radio. “Reboot, xxx is dragging and they have fouled yyy s anchor. They are dragging them across the mooring field. Can you hop in your dinghy and help out?” The dinghy is half full of rain water and the outboard doesn t like to run in the wet until it has warmed up but off Matt and I go to the scene of the crime. Someone had run a line between yyy and xxx so xxx was dragging both boats up to the very large and occupied mooring buoy. We got xxx tied to the buoy, rafted it up to the previous occupant and checked on yyy
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SailboatRacing-Rebootusa60493/~3/gSWe4kCEh2A/what-drag.html

Pacific Cruising Information

The New Soggy Paws One great thing about world cruising is that we all support each other. One of the most critical kinds of support is “local knowledge.” If you are planning on spending any time in the Pacific Ocean I strongly suggest you click on this link to
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SailboatRacing-Rebootusa60493/~3/mbaDWK7jGTM/pacific-cruising-information.html