Free at last

After several of having to depend on others for transportation my new dinghy arrived.  Yea!Fair winds and following  seas 🙂
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SailboatRacing-Rebootusa60493/~3/mNTadvtcMvk/free-at-last.html

Dinghy Woes

My dinghy just collapsed. All three tubes are not holding air. I guess it had a good run. So, another $4,000 to $5,000 unplanned expense. Complicated by the fact that it is near impossible to buy a new one in Indonesia. Not to mention the 70% tariff. The good news is that I am still on the Wonderful Sail 2 Indonesia Rally so I can grab rides. Fair winds and following seas 🙂 My thoughts are with those in the path of the hurricane.
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SailboatRacing-Rebootusa60493/~3/1A_CK2Ik3rA/dinghy-woes.html

Carrying a dinghy


I was asked the other day how I carry the dinghy on Reboot. I replied on the foredeck. Some cruisers choose davits on the stern. I can t. The Monitor™ steering vane is in the way. Even if I could I would not. I have heard and occasionally seen the results of a dinghy ripping the stern off a boat from severe wave action in high seas. So that leaves the foredeck or a tow. Towing might be reasonable in sheltered waters for short distances. I would never try to tow on a multi-day offshore passage. That leaves the foredeck. Not a great place. It is in the way every time one goes forward, e.g. to anchor, set up the whisker pole, set up or douse the asymmetric spinnaker. A more critical problem is that it takes a beating in high seas going upwind. That green water across the deck is bouncing off the dinghy. It needs to be very secure. Over time my system has evolved into the setup in the pictures below. The stern of the dinghy is attached by two crossed straps attached to the stern of the
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SailboatRacing-Rebootusa60493/~3/aEE_jjvgLLo/carrying-dinghy.html

The Dinghy Project


Starting in Pago Pago we noticed that the PVC part of the dinghy was coming loose from the fiberglass. We had a small tube of PVC glue and tried for a patch. It didn t work. When we got to Vuda Point we put the dinghy on the ground. Almost the entire seal between the PVC and the fiberglass was gone. Fortunately the local chandeliers had PVC glue, something we had been unable to find in American Samoa, Tonga and Savusavu. After many hours – most by Matt – of cleaning and scraping the old glue and dirt off today we reglued the entire dinghy. Thanks to Matt it is looking 100% better. Fair winds and following seas 🙂
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SailboatRacing-Rebootusa60493/~3/gYKp_TuO-z0/the-dinghy-project.html

Flooded!

No, not Reboot! The dinghy outboard engine. I went in for a quiet Sunday morning on shore. At about noon it was getting quite hot. I decided it was. Time to go back to Reboot for a swim.I went out to the dinghy. The fuel tank was bloated as I had closed the air vent on the fuel tank. I opened it, let the excess air out and tried to start the engine. After about 50 pulls I decided the engine was flooded. (I was both relieved and distressed when two cruisers were also unable to start their engines.) I returned to shore for about 15 minutes. When I returned I once again tried to start the engine again. No luck. Then I remembered from the carburetor days of my youth! I cranked the throttle fully open and pulled. A cough. Pulled a second time – zoom zoom! The magic solution from my youth.Fair winds and following seas 🙂
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SailboatRacing-Rebootusa60493/~3/4WrnHUHq-HY/flooded.html