The end of an era

It had to happen sometime. My odd Asus eeePC finally bit the bullet. Actually it succumbed to me spilling an entire cup of coffee on the keyboard. This was a tragedy. It could have been worse. The machine was 8 years old, could not be upgraded from Windows XP, and more and more applications were saying “no way” when I tried to run them. RIP I decided to purchase a small tablet – and Amazon Fire. I was surprised to find that they would not ship it to the Virgin Islands. Apparently some licensing issue. I have to pay to have it shipped to my PO box in Florida. Then they will send it to me here. What is particular stupid is that it will get shipped by the US Post Office from Florida to here. Dumb. Fair winds and following seas 🙂
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SailboatRacing-Rebootusa60493/~3/WrgldwdE_4Q/the-end-of-era.html

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The Odd Case of the Group MMSI


There are three (four) very common numbers for sailboats. The first is the hull identification number assigned by the builder. The second is the documentation number assigned by a government or by a locality (i.e. in the US by a State.) The third is a individual “Maritime Mobile Service Identity” (MMSI) assigned by the government telecommunications bureau (i.e. The Federal Communications Commission in the U.S.) [The fourth number is the International Maritime Organization (IMO) number. it is assigned to big ships] An individual MMSI identifies a ship’s radio installation. In a sense it is the “digital” embodiment of the ship station call sign (e.g. Reboot’s radio call WDB8435 identifies the same equipment as the MMSI 336 958 630.) Since automatic information systems (AIS) transmitters are radios it is also used to identify an AIS transmitter. In a digital selective calling enabled radio one can “ring” another ship or shore station by using the DSC function and the called station’s MMS
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SailboatRacing-Rebootusa60493/~3/VQR4oAMhXXw/the-odd-case-of-group-mmsi.html